Last Queen

My army defeated,
Stands before me.
No land we have invaded
But you have afflicted my faithful people
With your mortal disease..
You have destroyed my village
Where I was born
And grew up to be the woman
That I am today.

image

But in front of you,
I am still just a child..
You have killed my dreams and hopes
And I know that, somehow,
My people will blame me
For being so vulnerable
And from my weapons disarmed.
My dear, you must kill me
Before I become the last queen
That has ever lived.

Advertisements

Someone Like You

With a troubled soul
I have walked
In the land of the distressed
No hope has risen
In this abandoned land
I continue my path alone
Searching for another soul
Another being to save
And protect…
Troubled like me
And lost like me
Will he ever see?
How long I have waited
For a moment of recognition
A look in his eyes
A smile on his face
The question is,
And always will be…
Is he searching
For someone like me?

image

Copenhagen: a film by Mark Raso

Copenhagen. You would think upon reading the title that this is a film centered around the capital of Denmark in the vein of the usual movies that tackle the subject of a certain city’s mysteries. But Copenhagen is not only a film about the discovery of a city; it is also about the discovery of one’s self: a journey of self-discovery and family ties.

William, a 28 year-old immature guy, arrives in Copenhagen looking for answers about his father. All he has is a letter written in Danish. During his stay, he befriends a local girl Effy who decides to help him in his quest. The two create a bond over the next few days and William is surprised to discover that the girl of his dreams is only 14 years old, a fact that he was unaware of up until now.

The director Mark Raso deals with a sensitive issue through great delicacy, making us fall in love with the story as the two protagonists discover their feelings for one another on their way through the streets of Copenhagen.

This sort of build-up romance is cut short by William’s discovery of Effy’s age. It’s like a wakeup call that it’s time to man up just like the tagline of the film suggests:

“When the girl of your dreams is half your age, it’s time to grow up.”

Capture1